Arthritis Resources

by Josh

Arthritis Resources

Although there has been a lack of systematic research (in western countries), a case study published in The Lancet found that daily doses of 6 to 9 mg per day were sufficient to cause arthritis in an avid tea-drinker (Cook 1971). The subject of the study , an English woman with a 25-year history of debilitating arthritis, experienced complete relief in her symptoms within 6 months of stopping her tea consumption. In light of the woman’s recovery, the author concluded that “some cases of pain diagnosed as rheumatism or arthritis may be due to subclinical fluorosis which is not radiologically demonstrable.”

The best treatment of RA needs more than medicines alone. Patient education, such as how to cope with RA, also is important. Proper care requires the expertise of a team of providers, including rheumatologists, primary care physicians, and physical and occupational therapists. You will need frequent visits through the year with your rheumatologist. These checkups let your doctor track the course of your disease and check for any side effects of your medications. You likely also will need to repeat blood tests and X-rays or ultrasounds from time to time. What is the broader health impact of rheumatoid arthritis?Arthritis

 

Researchers and doctors have great difficulty in describing the epidemiology of juvenile arthritis. No known cause has been pinpointed for most forms of JA, nor is there evidence to suggest that toxins, foods, or allergies cause children to develop the disease. Some research points toward a genetic predisposition, which means the combination of genes a child receives from family members may cause the onset of arthritis when triggered by other factors. As JA's prevalence rises — and the belief is that the number of cases of children with JA is increasing — researchers are working to develop a more sophisticated understanding.

An increased risk of serious infections has been seen in clinical trials of other TNF blocking agents used in combination with anakinra or abatacept. Formal drug interaction studies have not been performed with rituximab or natalizumab; however because of the nature of the adverse events seen with these combinations with TNF blocker therapy, similar toxicities may also result from the use of CIMZIA® in these combinations. Therefore, the combination of CIMZIA® with anakinra, abatacept, rituximab, or natalizumab is not recommended. Interference with certain coagulation assays has been detected in patients treated with CIMZIA®. There is no evidence that CIMZIA® therapy has an effect on in vivo coagulation.

People afflicted with osteoarthritis often times have very little inflammation. As such, pain relievers such as acetaminophen, the most well know of which is Tylenol, may be effective. Acetaminophen is a pain reliever but does not reduce swelling. Acetaminophen does not cause stomach irritation and is less likely than nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), described later, to cause long-term side effects. Research has shown that acetaminophen relieves pain as effectively as NSAIDs for many patients with osteoarthritis. People with liver disease, people who drink alcohol heavily, and those taking blood- thinning medicines or NSAIDs should use acetaminophen with caution.

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